Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
CNNW 5
KGO (ABC) 3
KNTV (NBC) 3
MSNBCW 3
WJLA (ABC) 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
LANGUAGE
English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
goal of reconciliation. how much of that influenced other civil rights movements - in the u.s., for example. >> well, one of the things that is always interesting is it goes like this - that when you look at the civil rights movement, that it influenced other movements, particularly in south africa, and nelson mandela gave a tremendous amount of encouragement and credit to dr king, and the civil rights struggle. he paid whommage to that. what many don't see, it worked both way, there was an influence of reconciliation. the struggle weighed against apartheid, how he overcame that, but the spirit that nelson mandela governed in south africa and continued to energy us the still rights movement. when it came to los angeles in 1990, i was there and remember the energy from all the civil rights leaders in this city and other parts of the country. they saw nelson mandela not just as a foreign icon. but they saw him as one of them. so really the inspiration from nelson mandela, his leadership had a profound influence on the civil rights movement. >> i was going to ask you how it was
>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where pe
't remember much about the civil rights movement don't remember much about his life. they know what he stood for. i think, you know, today in south africa, even when people wake up in the morning because most people don't know he's transitioned and i use that word because in south africa, people don't talk about death and dying. they talk about transitioning and it's a happy time, and i'm sure they're going to be celebrating his life. i hope they will be teaching, teaching, teaching what nelson mandela stood for. this is a moment to teach. it's a teachable moment. as much as it is a moment to reflect and think about what nelson mandela has meant to the world and to these young people who can sing in that neighborhood where they used to not even be able to go without a pass, the black ones. it's that kind of thing that nelson mandela did away with that we need to remember. those young people could not have gone into that neighborhood a this time of night without a pass before nelson mandela and his people liberated the country. so that's what they're, you know, representing now. >> charlayne,
brazile is here, nelson mandela, the civil rights movement in the united states, what was going on in south africa, you and i are old enough to remember those days, the role and as christiane accurately points out, that all of us played in trying to move south africa in a better direction. you remember those days very vividly. >> well, the apartheid regime was a brutal regime. it was a violent regime. and the goal of folks in america, especially young people, was to educate, was to mobilize and to get more sanctions, to get corporations doing business in south africa to put pressure on the south african government. clearly it worked, because after years and years of struggle, finally in 1990, we broke the apartheid regime but it was a long and brutal struggle. >> here's a picture, take a look at this. >>> give us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south afri
-in with congressman walter fauntroy and civil rights leader mary frances berry at the south african embassy in washington, d.c they told the ambassador that they would not leave until their demands were met. >> first was the immediate release of nelson mandela from prison. the second demand was that all of the black political prisoners be released. and thirdly that they begin immediately the dismantlement of the apartheid system. >> reporter: all three were jailed. that one act of civil disobedience led to a year of daily protests at the embassy where celebrities, members of congress, and citizens were also arrested. >> we put 5,000 people in jail at the embassy and that drove the headlines. >> free south africa! >> reporter: the movement pressured politicians to act. >> on this vote -- >> reporter: and in 1986 congress overroad president reagan's veto and imposed trade sanctions against south africa. u.s. businesses were forced to divest, costing the regime over $350 million that year alone. four years later, mandela was free. >> nelson mandela taking his first steps into a new south afric
of apartheid south africa. they struck a deal where by civil rights and democracy came immediately. property rights were respected. a truth of reconciliation commission established under archbishop tutu which allowed south africans of all races to confront their past, but without recriminations that would have made relations poisonous. which was independence, freedom and democracy and equality for all south africans. i think that's really the example of his statesman ship and his vision. >> absolutely. south africa could never have gotten there without all those things you just pointed out. thanks so much. >> years ago, you in new york had an experience to spend time with nelson mandela. >> i did. there was a town hall meeting, i helped book hundreds of people in harlem who wanted to come when his first visit here in 1990, when nelson mandela came and i was so struck by his understated, yet ree gal presence and to listen to him speak, he was very unpolitically correct. he didn't shy away from them, but just to be around somebody who personified forgiveness was a very special experience. >> a
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
. the president and iconic champion of civil rights died thursday age 95 after years of illness. he was at his home in johannesburg surrounded by family. south african president jacob zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. mandela's hospital has been moved. this is the scene right outside mandela's home there in johannesburg in the out market neighborhood. you can see right now people are laying flowers and to bring tribute to the man widely seen as the father of modern south africa. he was president for five years. he stepped down, has not been president for 14 years but remains very much in the heart of so many people there. this news came later than night south african time and so right now as this country wakes up, 34 minutes past 8:00, many people are learning nelson mandela is at rest. >> and, of course, mandela accomplished so many great things. he was the father of a nation. he led south africa through its battle against oppression and on to democracy and it kept him away from home. he also stayed very close to his family as we've mentioned our r
. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the presence that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer pour and reconcile for those who jailed him set an example that all humanity took inspire to whether the lives of nation
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
of nelson mandela. >> the civil rights icon has 17 grandchildren, some of whom opened up in a rare interview with abc's rina ninan. >> reporter: set free after 27 years in prison. >> first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: some of his grandchildren found themselves longing for his prison days. >> those days i cherished because it was just the two of no one else. when he came out we did not have him because he had bigger issues to tackle. >> reporter: his grandson remembers visiting him when he was 4. >> he asked the wardens if he could put cartoons on the tv so me and my other cousins could sit and watch them and he offered us hot chocolate and he made it himself. >> reporter: his granddaughter said that while he couldn't physically touch them, his words always did. >> at the end of the visit he brought me a box of chocolates saying your visit will always be a bittersweet memory for me. >> reporter: words in the form of letters written to the family from jail. this one describing the moment that he was told his son was killed in a car accident. >> it describes his heart seems to st
. ♪ >>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers
. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them first. >>> in the united states our country's leaders past and present. we heard from president obama last night. let's go to the white house now and hear from brianna keilar. this was a personal moment for barack obama who talked about the influence of nelson mandela when he was a young man. >> reporter: tha
. although he did relax a little bit when i told him about my experience in the civil rights movement, but it brought to mind for him maya angelou, do you know her? talked about how he had -- they had read her work in prison. but then, as i watched him over the years as he spent more and more time in the outside world, he became a little more relaxed and talked more and more about what it was like in prison. and talk more and more about his own vision. he was always a very humble man. he never really -- although he was the leader, he never took credit. for example, when i asked him at a day back in his yard a few days after prison, when everybody thought he was going to be president, do you foresee a time when you will become president of this country? he said, well, you know, that's up to my -- i'm a loyal member of the african national congress and whatever they decide. behind the scene i understand he could rule with a kind of iron hand when necessary. but the face -- his face to the public was always of a genial giant. >> way he comported himself and humility is very genuine descr
>> a retired judge will lead an investigation into a suspected hate crime at san jose state university. civil rights advocate ladoris cordell will head an head an independent task force. members will look into what rules were broken and recommend changes to ensure student safety. four white students are accused of tormenting a black dorm-mate. >> some scary moments for shoppers. about 15 shoppers and workers were hurt when a car smashed into the trader joe's in oceanside, new york. police say an elderly woman lost control of her vehicle and went through the store windows. a witness decribed the >> it came right through the registers, it knocked over all of our registers that's the first thing i saw was the registers being backed up and one of my very close personal friends, i just grabbed her and pulled her out. >> now word on what caused the loss of vehicle control. 12 people were taken to the hosptial -- two of them seriously hurt. >> lane is approaching the bay area and we're even seen snow. here is looks from highway 24. the snow levels are bought 3,000 ft.. and no. we are seen snow down
and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee.
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
to know about american politics. fascinated by the american civil rights movement. martha: i think that is such an important point that you make about him and he was, he was sort of regal. he had a very regal bearing and yet he was humble which is such a great combination. >> awesome. i was remembering that when he came to the 50th anniversary of the united nations opening in new york, all the world leaders were around obviously and yet somehow mandela stood out as a leader among leaders because they all flocked to him. they all wanted photos with him shaking hands. i got to go over, i was like, it was unbelievable that the world leaders were almost like, tell us your secret. how did you do this? martha: yeah. and think one of the secrets was that he put everything before himself and that he was such a strong man and who was able to be, you know, in the face of that moment, was able to bring people together, much the way abraham lincoln did during the civil war period in the united states, to wrench the two sides back together for belief in a greater nation. >> wow, that was terrif
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
at a grass roots level struggling for civil rights and equality. he was seen as a down to earth person. when we talk about ordinary people in china, how did they perceive him? >> very much so. there are a number of comments on social media we are reading here going behind the normal tributes, getting into controversial areas, political criticism of current conditions in china. there are dissending voices arguing that the kind of things that nelson mandela fought for throughout a lifetime of struggle, social political process - some are in existence in china. there are people who identify with his struggle. we saw a comment saying that what china lacks right now is any kind of leader with nelson mandela's integrity. from another here, someone quoted on wavo, the chinese version of twitter. someone expressing the wish that there would be a chinese nelson mandela, someone that could bring about the chance that south africa won't through. >> how do you categorise the relationship between chinese and south african leaders? there's a lot of investment in african countries by china, some of which
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)